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Unter der Decke.

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From the acclaimed bestselling author of Sushi for Beginners and Angels comes a collection of personal essays on shopping, writing, moviemaking, motherhood and all the assorted calamities involved in being a savvy woman in the new millennium. Her novels are read and adored by millions around the world, and with Under the Duvet, Marian Keyes tackles the world of nonfiction. From the acclaimed bestselling author of Sushi for Beginners and Angels comes a collection of personal essays on shopping, writing, moviemaking, motherhood and all the assorted calamities involved in being a savvy woman in the new millennium. Her novels are read and adored by millions around the world, and with Under the Duvet, Marian Keyes tackles the world of nonfiction. These are her collected pieces: regular bulletins from the woman writing under the covers. Marian loves shoes and her LTFs (Long-Term Friends), hates realtors and lost luggage, and she once had a Christmas office party that involved roasting two sheep on a spit, Moroccan-style. She's just like you and me ... Featuring a wide compilation of Marian's journalism from magazines and newspapers, plus some exclusive, previously unpublished material, Under the Duvet is bursting with funny stories: observations on life, in-laws, weight loss, parties and driving lessons that will keep you utterly gripped -- either wincing with recognition or roaring with laughter.


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From the acclaimed bestselling author of Sushi for Beginners and Angels comes a collection of personal essays on shopping, writing, moviemaking, motherhood and all the assorted calamities involved in being a savvy woman in the new millennium. Her novels are read and adored by millions around the world, and with Under the Duvet, Marian Keyes tackles the world of nonfiction. From the acclaimed bestselling author of Sushi for Beginners and Angels comes a collection of personal essays on shopping, writing, moviemaking, motherhood and all the assorted calamities involved in being a savvy woman in the new millennium. Her novels are read and adored by millions around the world, and with Under the Duvet, Marian Keyes tackles the world of nonfiction. These are her collected pieces: regular bulletins from the woman writing under the covers. Marian loves shoes and her LTFs (Long-Term Friends), hates realtors and lost luggage, and she once had a Christmas office party that involved roasting two sheep on a spit, Moroccan-style. She's just like you and me ... Featuring a wide compilation of Marian's journalism from magazines and newspapers, plus some exclusive, previously unpublished material, Under the Duvet is bursting with funny stories: observations on life, in-laws, weight loss, parties and driving lessons that will keep you utterly gripped -- either wincing with recognition or roaring with laughter.

30 review for Unter der Decke.

  1. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I love Marian Keyes. My friends Kathy and Jenn would call her stuff "pink books" (i.e. frothy chick lit), and they definitely all start out that way: oh no, I'm getting married in three days and I'm too fat! Oh no, I woke up in some strange guy's house after a night of heavy drinking!! Oh no, I have nothing to wear to the party!!! Pretty standard Pink-ness. But then, somewhere along the way, Keyes' books turn your expectations on their ear. She writes about alcoholism, or loneliness, or having an I love Marian Keyes. My friends Kathy and Jenn would call her stuff "pink books" (i.e. frothy chick lit), and they definitely all start out that way: oh no, I'm getting married in three days and I'm too fat! Oh no, I woke up in some strange guy's house after a night of heavy drinking!! Oh no, I have nothing to wear to the party!!! Pretty standard Pink-ness. But then, somewhere along the way, Keyes' books turn your expectations on their ear. She writes about alcoholism, or loneliness, or having an adult relationship with your parents, and she does it with truth and depth. I think I've read every one of her novels now and each one has (pleasantly) surprised me in this way. So I was eager to read this collection of essays about the author's real life. It's good! Some of the stories--like the time she lost her passport two days before a trip to see her brother get married and had to plead her case to the bureaucrats at the Irish embassy--are standard Keysian comedy. Others, like when she recounts her recovery from addiction, are quietly moving. I confess that my favorite is the one where she somehow winds up as a beauty product tester for a magazine and gets daily shipments from all the cosmetics companies. Her description of her long-suffering husband's reaction is hilarious. But c'mon, doesn't that sound like a dream job to you, too? Free girly stuff in the mail?! In this essay more than any other, Keyes feels like a good girlfriend, the kind who gets to do things you've always wanted to do...and then loyally reports back, full of gossipy details.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    Starting out, I'm happy to report that I liked this collection of essays/columns/articles/short writings a great deal - actually lots more than I thought I would! I'm of course long gone needing to be convinced that Marian can do no wrong, but a collection of 50+ of shorts is usually not my bag. Anyway, before going into specifics (if there's going to be any specifics - don't know yet, depends on how this part is going). Just finishing sewing up a busted seam in my winter coat (since winter in S Starting out, I'm happy to report that I liked this collection of essays/columns/articles/short writings a great deal - actually lots more than I thought I would! I'm of course long gone needing to be convinced that Marian can do no wrong, but a collection of 50+ of shorts is usually not my bag. Anyway, before going into specifics (if there's going to be any specifics - don't know yet, depends on how this part is going). Just finishing sewing up a busted seam in my winter coat (since winter in Sweden decided to hold off for most of..., well, winter, and then go stir-cracy in March) I felt I needed to comment on one thing. Actually two things - Marian states somewhere in here that she'd like to read more on some topics, one being 'feminism' or 'gender equality', which she says she doesn't know very much about. This, along with a few passages, was an eye-opener for me. We're the same age (roughly) and I feel we have loads in common. But I did jump a bit, when she stated in "Ten Housework Laws for Men" that "If you're not going to do your own ironing, then be very careful about what clothes you buy..."! Where I come from, the only logical continuation of that sentence would have been ..."then you are going to be wearing wrinkled clothes". It's something very wrong with something, I think, when grown men cannot or will not perform the basics when it comes to themselves - and - usually with 'pride': "I do not cook/clean/wash/etc." That, to me, basically, is like saying "I'm effing useless, and proud of it." Having my mum for a visit after moving out on my own she asked me "When did you learn to iron?" and I said "When I needed to." (Never mind she could do the Royal Theatre's wardrobe in the time I do a "wrinkle-free" shirt good enough to be worn under a cardigan, it's the principle - either you are able, or you're...not.) In other instances, we are tuned in to perfection - airplane travel, work, gardening, vacationing, Christmas, being a psycho magnet - I feel I could have written it if only I could write. Prior to this book, I read "Brightest Star" and was a wee bit nervous on account of the mixed reviews (I know I shouldn't be, but you know...), but I was thrilled to find out that I liked it very much. I awarded it 4 stars and at the same time looked back over my reviews of MK, finding that all were 4 or 5. Not surprised and I said so in the review. This one started out very 3 star and I thought that this matters not of course because a) short-shorts only is not really my bag, b) no-one can keep a perfect score and c) no-one probably cares. I was thrilled to find the combined texts engrossing, funny, and compelling and being nowhere near the measly 3-star mark! 4 it is and further excursions under the duvet will be commenced shortly...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Yrinsyde

    This is a gorgeous autobiography! Very sweet and funny. Actually, this book is a collection of magazine articles that Marian Keyes wrote about her experiences - in love, finding a place to live, a job, battling alcoholism. I laughed out loud and had tears in my eyes, and although some of her experiences were far from my everyday life, I felt touched. This was the first book I read by her, and it took me to reading her novels. I've just bought her new one! Marian Keyes - the 21st century woman's go This is a gorgeous autobiography! Very sweet and funny. Actually, this book is a collection of magazine articles that Marian Keyes wrote about her experiences - in love, finding a place to live, a job, battling alcoholism. I laughed out loud and had tears in my eyes, and although some of her experiences were far from my everyday life, I felt touched. This was the first book I read by her, and it took me to reading her novels. I've just bought her new one! Marian Keyes - the 21st century woman's goddess!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sally Whiteside

    My first book by this author and it was tons of fun. I loved her stories and all the honesty in them. I laughed lots and when I wasn't laughing I still had a smile plastered on my face.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Redfox5

    A good collection of articles written by Chick-lit queen Marian Keyes. Very relatable in places and guaranteed to make you chuckle.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Danderma

    Searching through the shelves at Waterstones I saw this book by Marian Keyes. I've read for Marian Keyes once before very recently, a book by the name "The Brightest Star in the Sky" and I set about buying more of her work. Luckily, I didn't only find a novel, I found a collection of articles previously published and unpublished all about the writer's life. The woman is hilarious! I love her sense of humor and her wit. Her honesty in dealing with alcoholism, growing up, and weight loss. I could t Searching through the shelves at Waterstones I saw this book by Marian Keyes. I've read for Marian Keyes once before very recently, a book by the name "The Brightest Star in the Sky" and I set about buying more of her work. Luckily, I didn't only find a novel, I found a collection of articles previously published and unpublished all about the writer's life. The woman is hilarious! I love her sense of humor and her wit. Her honesty in dealing with alcoholism, growing up, and weight loss. I could totally identify with some of her stories, especially the one about becoming the husband's finder of things, I actually sat my husband down and read him that part while shooting him daggers with my looks because apparently men are the same all over the planet. Plus, it seems we are not the only nation suffering in trying to celebrate Mother's Day, not everyone is happy about it it seems :p I loved the book. I laughed out loud and kept laughing out loud while supposedly trying to sleep, jerking the poor husband awake from his slumber! The book is a great read and I am more than glad to purchase the second book of its kind, "Further Under the Duvet". I'm only sorry it took me so long to realize its out there. Highly recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Siria

    A mostly amiable and low-key amusing collection of short essays, ideal for an ex-pat who's missing being surrounded by Irish voices and diction. (Though Marian Keyes never actually explains what words like stocious, wan, yoke, etc. mean so parts might be confusing for non-Irish people.) The essays about Keyes' battles with depression and alcoholism are less frothy pieces than the pink cover might lead you to expect, but that's par for the course with her style of writing. The one real bum note i A mostly amiable and low-key amusing collection of short essays, ideal for an ex-pat who's missing being surrounded by Irish voices and diction. (Though Marian Keyes never actually explains what words like stocious, wan, yoke, etc. mean so parts might be confusing for non-Irish people.) The essays about Keyes' battles with depression and alcoholism are less frothy pieces than the pink cover might lead you to expect, but that's par for the course with her style of writing. The one real bum note is the very last piece, about a trip which she and her husband made to Vietnam—it takes a patronising, infantilising approach to the Vietnamese which earlier pieces in the book criticise the English for adopting towards the Irish.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bhavya

    2.5 stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Talulah Mankiller

    « More Facebook Hate Boinking in the Bayou, Part WHY GOD WHY » Quick Reviews of Books I Forgot About Apr 28th, 2010 by Talulah Edit | Ariana Franklin, A Murderous Procession (Mistress of the Art of Death) The fourth in her Mistress of the Art of Death series, which is about a female medieval forensic pathologist. Seriously, it’s much better than it sounds. HOWEVER. This last book? Not a fan. On the one hand, Franklin introduced a potential new love interest whom I find MUCH more compelling than our c « More Facebook Hate Boinking in the Bayou, Part WHY GOD WHY » Quick Reviews of Books I Forgot About Apr 28th, 2010 by Talulah Edit | Ariana Franklin, A Murderous Procession (Mistress of the Art of Death) The fourth in her Mistress of the Art of Death series, which is about a female medieval forensic pathologist. Seriously, it’s much better than it sounds. HOWEVER. This last book? Not a fan. On the one hand, Franklin introduced a potential new love interest whom I find MUCH more compelling than our current one, so that’s nice. But on the other hand? The murderer hears voices, worships Satan, etc. Dude, isn’t that like, the second time she’s done that? Look, I love you Franklin, I really do, but crazy does not always equal evil and murderous. To be perfectly blunt, your most compelling mystery was the one wherein the motive was purely political. Stop maligning the mentally ill, okay? “He did it cause he’s CRAZY!” is not terribly interesting from a plot perspective, nor is it kind. Recommended for: Um, well, if you haven’t read any of the others? This won’t appeal at all. If you have read the others, you might as well keep right on going. Marian Keyes, Under the Duvet: Shoes, Reviews, Having the Blues, Builders, Babies, Families and Other Calamities In a word? Awful. Keyes has always been pretty problematic (who can forget the underlying homophobia of Angels, or the ham-handed discussion of racism in Sushi for Beginners?), but until now, she’s never actively made me want to throw something at her. A collection of short essays, most of which have appeared elsewhere, Under the Duvet covers a lot of ground—alcoholism, love of shoes, bad vacations—and is occasionally quite charming. But the final essay is about a trip Keyes took to Vietnam, and I was honestly disgusted by how racist and clueless she was. Like…god. The most polite thing I can relate is that she talked about how she’s got extremely small feet—her word was something like “freakish”—but while she was in Vietnam, she could finally find nice shoes in her size! Because the Vietnamese, they all have freakishly small feet! Oh, Marian. Shut the fuck up. Recommended for: NOT.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Scott

    As a long-time fan of Marian Keyes, I was super excited for another book of hers. I have to say, this let me down. Not because it was bad, don't get me wrong; it just didn't have what I love about her. I guess it wasn't what I was expecting. All of the small stories in there were articles from the magazine she used to write for. I didn't want articles; I wanted stories! They were all fun, on their own. But I like to have one story, that goes through the entire book. They weren't even organised i As a long-time fan of Marian Keyes, I was super excited for another book of hers. I have to say, this let me down. Not because it was bad, don't get me wrong; it just didn't have what I love about her. I guess it wasn't what I was expecting. All of the small stories in there were articles from the magazine she used to write for. I didn't want articles; I wanted stories! They were all fun, on their own. But I like to have one story, that goes through the entire book. They weren't even organised in chronological order! I think that was kind of the point, but it could get a little confusing. They were written for someone who had read her articles for a long time. But, of course, this was the first time I had. She referenced things like "Himself", and didn't explain them for a long time. It bothered me, maybe more than it should have. But if I'd read these as individual stories, instead of as one collection, I would've been pretty happy. You can see all of her characters in the way she writes. I completely understand why she loves her husband, and I related to so many of her stories. I was in fits of laughter with most of them. Just, frustrated at the same time. Even though this was non-fiction, it still had every bit of Keyes creativity and unique writing style. I worship the ground she walks on, even if I was let down by this book. Personally, I think I'm going to stick to her fiction writing. But if you were looking for something short, or something to read over a few weeks (as in maybe an article a day), this would be perfect. I just wish I'd known that before I started...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Namitha Varma

    One of the most hilarious set of articles I've read of late. I think I'm in love with Keyes. My kinda gal!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    After reading the 'Brightest Star in the Sky', I was curious to find out more about the author. Everything I read said that book was a departure from her typical style, and when I took out one of her other books from the library, it was so Chick-Lit I returned it without cracking the spine. I wondered if something had happened to change her style. This book doesn't answer that question (it was published at the height of her chick-lit fame), but this series of essays was very funny, very Irish in After reading the 'Brightest Star in the Sky', I was curious to find out more about the author. Everything I read said that book was a departure from her typical style, and when I took out one of her other books from the library, it was so Chick-Lit I returned it without cracking the spine. I wondered if something had happened to change her style. This book doesn't answer that question (it was published at the height of her chick-lit fame), but this series of essays was very funny, very Irish in style and a great light read. With a lot of humor and grace, she describes her big family, her frustrations with her weight and alcohol abuse, dating and getting married in a way that you feel like you're speaking with an old friend. She's very warm and easy to relate to, and I really wanted to read more essays. Most of these pieces were previously published in The Tatler or the Irish Times, and they offered an interesting window into the life of a very popular novelist. Maybe I'll pick up one of those chick-lit books again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karschtl

    I must say that I enjoy Keyes' novels a lot more than her columns. I just didn't find the little stories overly interesting or funny. Jen Lancaster does a way better job of recording everyday bits of life. But that's Lancaster 'normal' job, and Keyes' is to write novels. However, it was revealing to read about the life she lead in her late teenage years and throughout her twenties. I wouldn't have thought it was that fucked up. It is a nice read for the gym, which is were I read the book. There it I must say that I enjoy Keyes' novels a lot more than her columns. I just didn't find the little stories overly interesting or funny. Jen Lancaster does a way better job of recording everyday bits of life. But that's Lancaster 'normal' job, and Keyes' is to write novels. However, it was revealing to read about the life she lead in her late teenage years and throughout her twenties. I wouldn't have thought it was that fucked up. It is a nice read for the gym, which is were I read the book. There it's very good to read only small 'chapters', on the couch this wouldn't be the perfect book for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Roudha A 240-521

    Under the duvet is an autobiography written by Marian Keyes who is known as the best-selling Irish author and her novels are read by millions around the world. This book consists of seven sections and each one includes different articles. At the beginning, I have a difficulty in understanding the author language but then I get used to it. The part that I found it hilarious was the essay in which she discusses the Irish people’s inability to give directions using street names or addresses. While Under the duvet is an autobiography written by Marian Keyes who is known as the best-selling Irish author and her novels are read by millions around the world. This book consists of seven sections and each one includes different articles. At the beginning, I have a difficulty in understanding the author language but then I get used to it. The part that I found it hilarious was the essay in which she discusses the Irish people’s inability to give directions using street names or addresses. While the part I didn't like in this novel was her experience with alcoholism. I recommend this book to people who love to read non-fiction books.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ape

    I wrote the review on bookcrossing a few years later in 2006 and I wasn't writing much at that time! This is most definately my favourite Marian Keyes book. I love short stories, and these are great little reads to dip into. I especially liked her guide to housecleaning for men, and these funny little insights into her married life.... several of which seem familiar and I'm not even married!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tamie

    2.5 stars It's a funny diary about Keyes's life until late 90s. Sometimes I was a little bored, lucky me all of them are short essays, magazine publications. And now I know where some background stories of her books came from.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I want to write like this. Her non-fiction a hundred times better than her fiction. An excellent judge of not saying too much. The story on her alcoholic journey the most plausible and honest I have ever read. Feel like comparing her to caitlin moran.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Marian Keyes first collection of journalism is full of anecdotal humour and witty, wry observations about herself, others and life in all its absurd, calamitous and joyful incarnations. Fans will delight to read about the real life situations that inspired some of the most memorable scenes from her novels. Whilst mostly light-hearted and funny, she is also admirably frank about her personal troubles and candidly describes her struggles with alcoholism, depression and her personal journey of reco Marian Keyes first collection of journalism is full of anecdotal humour and witty, wry observations about herself, others and life in all its absurd, calamitous and joyful incarnations. Fans will delight to read about the real life situations that inspired some of the most memorable scenes from her novels. Whilst mostly light-hearted and funny, she is also admirably frank about her personal troubles and candidly describes her struggles with alcoholism, depression and her personal journey of recovery. Overall an uplifting and delightful read with unassuming hidden depths. "But the great thing is that when we do argue, we have very flexible boundaries within which to gave the row- they'll stretch but they won't break. I like the feeling that we'll both stick around to make sure it works." "I only have a couple of Long-Term Friends: Jenny who I've known since my teens, and Suzanne, who I've known since childhood... Suzanne treats me as an extension of herself, we're just straight in, exactly as it always was. There's no awkwardness, no warm-up period, and no special treatment." "But the downside with Long-Term Friends is that you can get away with less. They know your patterns, so there's nowhere to run to, nowhere to hide... These friends have the large-scale map of who we really are. Which can sometimes be a right pain and, more often, can be strangely comforting." "... my head tightens with disbelief. But at the time my denial blocked out all light. I didn't know that denial is as big a part of alcoholism as the drinking, that it grows in direct proportion to it, so that I was constantly normalizing the abnormal." "Now that I'm past my prime, I've had to let go of several visions or versions of myself. Better versions, of course. I used to think that being alive was some sort of apprenticeship where I'd get to a certain age and all of a sudden I'd be able to do life... But now I accept that it's never going to happen... But it's fine. The only weird thing is that, paradoxically, I still feel like I'm a teenager. I'm still waiting to feel grown-up (as opposed to just getting old)... Even though I have many of the trappings of adulthood... I'm still waiting for that glorious moment when I truly feel like a grown-up. I suspect I'll probably proceed directly from adolescence to the menopause."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I've been reading a lot of essay collections by women lately, and this one was very similar - autobiographical with a good sense of humor. I've read quite a few books by Marian Keyes, and it was interesting to learn more about her, specifically that she battled with alcoholism and depression. But I also enjoyed reading about her adventures in London and then moving home to Ireland with her English husband (referred to as mainly "Himself" in this book). I loved stories about her family, including I've been reading a lot of essay collections by women lately, and this one was very similar - autobiographical with a good sense of humor. I've read quite a few books by Marian Keyes, and it was interesting to learn more about her, specifically that she battled with alcoholism and depression. But I also enjoyed reading about her adventures in London and then moving home to Ireland with her English husband (referred to as mainly "Himself" in this book). I loved stories about her family, including her story about getting a passport last minute to visit her sister in New York (that the guy at the embassy actually asked her if she checked her drawers and had she prayed to St. Anthony? -- "As God is my witness, I'm not making any of this up.") I would also mention that the subtitle of the book is a little bit of a misnomer- she does talk about shoes, babies and families, but the content is all over the place. I did enjoy the chapter about babies, particularly because I'm less than 2 months from having my first: "I'm baffled why something as allegedly natural as childbirth should hurt so much. Mother Nature must have had an off day..."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura Sansom

    Living and working as a writer has its misconceptions and Marian blows them out of the water. Declaring that writing can be just as nine to five as an office job but possibly less glamorous. She lets us read her life story and follow in detail that rather than living as a writer she lives as a woman who struggles all the same with many a challenge in her life. Marian draws on events both humorously or quite dramatically emotional but still she carries on. Reading this book was like clinging to Living and working as a writer has its misconceptions and Marian blows them out of the water. Declaring that writing can be just as nine to five as an office job but possibly less glamorous. She lets us read her life story and follow in detail that rather than living as a writer she lives as a woman who struggles all the same with many a challenge in her life. Marian draws on events both humorously or quite dramatically emotional but still she carries on. Reading this book was like clinging to a plot of a soap opera or a reality show but less likely to "trend" and with no cliff hangers. There are parts you declare "Well I never" and I think as she defends and explains some her of choices and regrets there is an underlining feel that shes the type of woman that will help any feminist movement. There is something in this read that as a reader you will laugh at, nod your head too and sympathize with. Why isn't Marian Keyes an agony aunt?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Pg 109: (On childbirth being so painful) “Mother Nature must have had an off day when she sat at the drawing board and invented the ins and outs of giving birth...I can see how it gets in all right, no complaints there, but you’re impressing no one with your plan for getting it back out again.” Pg 182: I’ve been on a diet for most of my adult life and I’m fatter now than I’ve ever been. This made me remember how much I like Marian Keyes. I could relate to a lot of her stories and I enjoy her hones Pg 109: (On childbirth being so painful) “Mother Nature must have had an off day when she sat at the drawing board and invented the ins and outs of giving birth...I can see how it gets in all right, no complaints there, but you’re impressing no one with your plan for getting it back out again.” Pg 182: I’ve been on a diet for most of my adult life and I’m fatter now than I’ve ever been. This made me remember how much I like Marian Keyes. I could relate to a lot of her stories and I enjoy her honesty. A few things I didn’t quite understand regarding Ireland etc but still enjoyable to read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gemma Harris

    As a lover of books that are in fact collections of articles (The World According to Clarkson in my lists anyone?) AND a lover of the Queen of Chick Lit herself I couldn't resist this wondrous second hand book shop find. It is every bit as I expected it to be. Funny, sometime thought provoking, relatable and did I mention funny? My only gripe is that I wanted it to be longer. But there is always the sequel which I am now purchasing forthwith. So, like this review, Under the Duvet is short and swe As a lover of books that are in fact collections of articles (The World According to Clarkson in my lists anyone?) AND a lover of the Queen of Chick Lit herself I couldn't resist this wondrous second hand book shop find. It is every bit as I expected it to be. Funny, sometime thought provoking, relatable and did I mention funny? My only gripe is that I wanted it to be longer. But there is always the sequel which I am now purchasing forthwith. So, like this review, Under the Duvet is short and sweet but unlike this review its downright awesome.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    The first few stories were quite entertaining to read, but the whole book got boring rather quickly. The author's very quick to stereotype, see the chapter about her trips to Germany, Austria etc, it's not funny. I also didn't like the gender roles which were portrayed throughout the book... She likes or dislikes things because she's a woman, her husband likes or dislikes things because he's a man. Okay, if you think so... And in the last chapter there was some kind of underlying racism that I j The first few stories were quite entertaining to read, but the whole book got boring rather quickly. The author's very quick to stereotype, see the chapter about her trips to Germany, Austria etc, it's not funny. I also didn't like the gender roles which were portrayed throughout the book... She likes or dislikes things because she's a woman, her husband likes or dislikes things because he's a man. Okay, if you think so... And in the last chapter there was some kind of underlying racism that I just can't ignore.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I hadn't read anything by Marian Keyes before, but this book might just persuade me to change my mind. I noticed it in the 'Biographies' section of our local library and the humorous title and cover intrigued me. While it is only autobiographical in the loosest sense - it's a collection of articles based on events and situations in the author's life, some previously published, some not - it's a fun read and drew me on despite my moans that I don't actually LIKE collections of literary shorts (ar I hadn't read anything by Marian Keyes before, but this book might just persuade me to change my mind. I noticed it in the 'Biographies' section of our local library and the humorous title and cover intrigued me. While it is only autobiographical in the loosest sense - it's a collection of articles based on events and situations in the author's life, some previously published, some not - it's a fun read and drew me on despite my moans that I don't actually LIKE collections of literary shorts (articles and stories, that is). Off to borrow the sequel tomorrow.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    This book was entertaining but not something I will read again. It is random articles and things Marian Keyes has written about her life. They aren't in order necessarily (which I wish they would've been so we could watch the progression of her life a little more) but they only span 2-3 years. She talks about living in London and Dublin, her family, her work, etc. all in a funny way but I found myself skimming a lot.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lis

    This was a chore to plod through. Not in terms of reading difficulty, more boredom. Whilst I appreciate that there may be a significant amount of poetic licence taken in the recounting of these tales (or at least I hope there has!), it hasn't necessarily made better writing. Instead, the author and her associates come across as none too bright, and trying to read it in an Irish accent doesn't make it any funnier. Tedious.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan Cairney

    I haven't read it all and what I have read was no biggy, it's just little clips of stuff she has or hasn't had published previously in magazines etc. I haven't read any other Marian Keyes stuff and definitely started off on the wrong book here so have shelved it, will read a chapter or so when I feel like it which will probably be never.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Estepp

    3 1/2. Picked up a copy of this at the library book store. I love Keyes, but have only read some of her novels, so these short pieces were great fun (and, in the land of tmi, a terrific book to keep in the bathroom), if a wee bit dated. Promptly ordered used copies of her other column collections, so I suppose that's a decent testimony, no?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Avid Reader

    2s and 5s balance each other in a very readable collection. If you're not Irish yourself it'll help to have a friendly one hanging around for cultural insight & the occasional pronunciation tip. My one knew how to say Tadhg!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I wanted something light to read, and this was definitely light, but maybe too shallow. There was occasional humor. I think the biggest problem is I didn't realize how old it was. Most of the stories were written between the years 1998-2000, so they felt really outdated.

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