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Grau 26

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Grau 26 é muito mais que um livro. É uma experiência revolucionária que mistura leitura, com elementos cinematográficos e interatividade digital, o primeiro digilivro da história. Criado por Anthony E. Zuiker, visionário roteirista da série de TV CSI, traz o perito Steve Dark e sua equipe na perseguição ao mais terrível psicopata de todos os tempos. Um homem tão perverso q Grau 26 é muito mais que um livro. É uma experiência revolucionária que mistura leitura, com elementos cinematográficos e interatividade digital, o primeiro digilivro da história. Criado por Anthony E. Zuiker, visionário roteirista da série de TV CSI, traz o perito Steve Dark e sua equipe na perseguição ao mais terrível psicopata de todos os tempos. Um homem tão perverso que não se encaixa nos 25 graus de perversidade estipulados pela lei. Para ele, é necessário criar o grau 26. Leia. Veja. Acesse. Tenha medo. CSI e a série de TV mais assistida no mundo, com cerca de 2 bilhões de espectadores em mais de 200 países. Os leitores terão acesso a conteúdo digital exclusivo, incluindo 20 ciberpontes, que contém vídeos, áudios e elementos interativos que complementam a história. Através do portal os leitores poderão interagir entre eles e com a historia. O filme que complementa o livro é uma produção caprichada. No elenco: Bill Duke, Michael Ironside e outros.


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Grau 26 é muito mais que um livro. É uma experiência revolucionária que mistura leitura, com elementos cinematográficos e interatividade digital, o primeiro digilivro da história. Criado por Anthony E. Zuiker, visionário roteirista da série de TV CSI, traz o perito Steve Dark e sua equipe na perseguição ao mais terrível psicopata de todos os tempos. Um homem tão perverso q Grau 26 é muito mais que um livro. É uma experiência revolucionária que mistura leitura, com elementos cinematográficos e interatividade digital, o primeiro digilivro da história. Criado por Anthony E. Zuiker, visionário roteirista da série de TV CSI, traz o perito Steve Dark e sua equipe na perseguição ao mais terrível psicopata de todos os tempos. Um homem tão perverso que não se encaixa nos 25 graus de perversidade estipulados pela lei. Para ele, é necessário criar o grau 26. Leia. Veja. Acesse. Tenha medo. CSI e a série de TV mais assistida no mundo, com cerca de 2 bilhões de espectadores em mais de 200 países. Os leitores terão acesso a conteúdo digital exclusivo, incluindo 20 ciberpontes, que contém vídeos, áudios e elementos interativos que complementam a história. Através do portal os leitores poderão interagir entre eles e com a historia. O filme que complementa o livro é uma produção caprichada. No elenco: Bill Duke, Michael Ironside e outros.

30 review for Grau 26

  1. 5 out of 5

    MischaS_

    After finishing the whole series I still think that the first book was the best one. And I loved the videos those were super awesome. Would love to have more books like this. Still, remember when I brought it to school with me and talked about it with my friends. One of the "catchy" phrases on the book cover was "Chat with the killer". Which meant that there is a video of the detective chatting with the killer. And my friends were like; you should be really careful! Chatting with a killer! What After finishing the whole series I still think that the first book was the best one. And I loved the videos those were super awesome. Would love to have more books like this. Still, remember when I brought it to school with me and talked about it with my friends. One of the "catchy" phrases on the book cover was "Chat with the killer". Which meant that there is a video of the detective chatting with the killer. And my friends were like; you should be really careful! Chatting with a killer! What are you thinking? :D Fun times.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Dark Origins hit the world at just the right time, when overdramatic FBI depictions on television like Criminal Minds were all the rage. It's not bad but I felt like it was trying too hard to push itself as this incredible psychological horror akin to Silence of the Lambs or Session 9 when really it was just recycling the same pattern of similar stories that we've all seen time and time again. Its dialogue felt way too over-the-top and cheesy, and its characters were unbelievably ridiculous for Dark Origins hit the world at just the right time, when overdramatic FBI depictions on television like Criminal Minds were all the rage. It's not bad but I felt like it was trying too hard to push itself as this incredible psychological horror akin to Silence of the Lambs or Session 9 when really it was just recycling the same pattern of similar stories that we've all seen time and time again. Its dialogue felt way too over-the-top and cheesy, and its characters were unbelievably ridiculous for the most part.

  3. 4 out of 5

    William Thomas

    I don't ask for any kind of literary high-mindedness when I read throw-away modern crime novels. This book, however, has some of the worst prose I have ever read, but the scene where the killer flenses the hair in his anus was a treat. Duane Swierczynski writes amazing comic books. He does. You should go out and pick up his runs on Immortal Iron Fist and Werewolf by Night: In the Blood. What you should absolutely avoid is this "interactive" novel that he co-wrote with the creator of, ugh, the tel I don't ask for any kind of literary high-mindedness when I read throw-away modern crime novels. This book, however, has some of the worst prose I have ever read, but the scene where the killer flenses the hair in his anus was a treat. Duane Swierczynski writes amazing comic books. He does. You should go out and pick up his runs on Immortal Iron Fist and Werewolf by Night: In the Blood. What you should absolutely avoid is this "interactive" novel that he co-wrote with the creator of, ugh, the television show CSI. I feel like the scripts and teleplays from episodes of CSI, the worst crime drama/recreation ever to air on television, would make for more literary read than this book. The hack writing of the show would be easier to follow and only half as convoluted. The premise drew me in enough to make me pick the book up instead of straight out selling it on amazon.com when it came in the mail from a book club I belong to. A Level 26 killer, a new kind of killer that surpasses all other killers ever known to man. This is a new breed of killer because the scale stops at 25. Problem with this premise? No killer ranked currently surpasses level 22 currently and the killer in the book is no exception. There is nothing that this killer does that outranks Gacy or Gary Ridgway. I'm not saying that this isn't brutal, but it doesn't match the premise. The killer only eludes the police for nearly 30 years, which, as most people know, Ridgway almost did as well.... so.... yeah... What makes this killer different? Absolutely nothing. It couldn't be sold on it's own merit so it had to come up with a selling point and I admittedly fell for it. But about 30 pages in I began to realize that the book wasn't what it had claimed. So instead of getting something new, we get a rehashing of Thomas Harris' Red Dragon, and that is really all this book is. What I would have preferred was a very single-minded killer and an in-depth analysis of the killer and motives. Instead, he kills anyone he wants. This is supposed to make him more dangerous. What it makes him is unbelievable and cartoonish. You want a good serial killer book, or at least a decent one? Read Red Dragon. Better yet, watch serial killer movies like Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer and Maniac. Or read one of the many non-fiction books on actual serial killers because they are actually worth the time and energy and all the more shocking for being REAL. Take this book and flense someone's anus with it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carmaletta Hilton

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I started out with high hopes for this book, but the further I got into it, the worse it became. It's in the category of great idea, poorly executed. There's so much wrong with this book I don't even know where to begin. First of all, the idea of a Level 26 killer. It's interesting, but in the end, he's no different than one of Dr. Michael Stone's Level 22 killers. The only thing that makes him "special" is that they couldn't catch him for 30 years. Well, look how long it took to catch BTK and h I started out with high hopes for this book, but the further I got into it, the worse it became. It's in the category of great idea, poorly executed. There's so much wrong with this book I don't even know where to begin. First of all, the idea of a Level 26 killer. It's interesting, but in the end, he's no different than one of Dr. Michael Stone's Level 22 killers. The only thing that makes him "special" is that they couldn't catch him for 30 years. Well, look how long it took to catch BTK and he's only a 22. Also, his motives weren't even anything new, just the same old religious nutcase ramblings of most other fictional serial killers. Squeegle was creepy as hell, I'll give you that, but I couldn't even call him terrifying because sometimes, he was just plain comical, especially when the videos are added in. The continuity errors are the biggest problem in the book. If you go to the book's website, you'll see that Zuiker has started a contest for finding the most errors. I thought this was kind of funny at first, but really... There shouldn't BE that many errors, especially that many huge errors. I was pulled out of the story so often by the errors that it was hard to really just go with it. The biggest mistake he made was trying to give timelines. None of his timelines match up. He tells us in the beginning about one of Squeegle's "earliest" kills... In 1990. This is the mother in the car wash. Except, it's 2009 in the story. A couple pages before 1990, he tells us Squeegle has been killing for over twenty years. 1990 to today is less than twenty. Then, later, we're told his earliest is 1979, which makes it 30 years. Also, he tells us that Dark spent a year after his family's murder on a rampage, trying to find Squeegle. It's made clear that it was either a full year or a better part of a year. So how is it that Dark has been with Sibby for a year and a half, when he met her AFTER the year he spent in various places? Continuity is a HUGE problem here, and I expect better. There is no way a book like that, priced so high, should make it onto the shelves with as many problems as there were. On top of all that, some things just don't make sense. Most of Wycoff's actions don't make sense, neither does his ability to do these things. Much like Squeegle at times, Wycoff was mostly just cartoonish, reminding me of some mustache twirling villain in a cartoon. I just could not like this book. The further I went in, the more I wished it was over. I stopped watching the videos about halfway through. They were mostly unnecessary, and sometimes they even made the continuity issues worse. I give Zuiker credit for the concept. He tried something new. It just didn't work, at least for me. I will be staying away from future digi-novels, and unless the editors working with him learn how to do their jobs, I'll not be reading anything else Zuiker puts out. I just can't have respect for an author that doesn't have enough respect for me as a reader to give me quality work. Next time, he should be more focused on the actual writing and not just on his super cool new idea.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Fatuma

    Review ex-posted on my blog: Before I even start, let me just get it out there: LEVEL 26 IS A MUST READ!!! DON'T HESITATE OR CONTEMPLATE, JUST GO GET IT!!!!!! Alright, reading this book is like nothing else that you're ever read. It is an experience. You don't simply read this novel, you live it! You fear for the victims, an you're scared crapless by the killer. Every 20 pages or so of the novel, provides with a code that you put in at level26.com. This unlocks a video clip that enhances the readi Review ex-posted on my blog: Before I even start, let me just get it out there: LEVEL 26 IS A MUST READ!!! DON'T HESITATE OR CONTEMPLATE, JUST GO GET IT!!!!!! Alright, reading this book is like nothing else that you're ever read. It is an experience. You don't simply read this novel, you live it! You fear for the victims, an you're scared crapless by the killer. Every 20 pages or so of the novel, provides with a code that you put in at level26.com. This unlocks a video clip that enhances the reading experience. The clips enable you to witness the characters fears, and the monster's thought process! Sweegel is the CREEPIEST, STRANGEST criminal I've ever seen! He's unlike anything you've ever seen before and that combined with Zuiker's writing style makes this novel extremely captivating. I read all 400 pages in ONE NIGHT! There was no way I could put down the book until I knew whether or not a certain someone lives, or if Sweegal is caught and how! But this book is only the first book in a series, so there's an INSANE cliff-hanger at the end! I don't know how I'm going to wait for book 2! I CAN NOT WAIT!!! By the way, Did I mention that Level 26 is a MUST READ!!!! I did? Well, it's worth mentioning over and over. IT'S A MUST READ!!!!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    Ick, ick and ick. I heard about this book before it came out and it sounded interesting. That was until I actually saw the book and noticed that it describes itself as "from the visionary creator of CSI." Wow. Self-glorify much? He's said in interviews that he believes books need to "evolve" to keep up with television and video viewing and this is his plan to move reading forward into the new age. I say books are fine. Leave them alone.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Exanimis

    What a concept, read the story and watch short videos online that enhance the story. I really wanted to like this book but found myself disgusted with the cliche's early on. An old, hard as nails, cop who is only months from retirement and a washed up drunk who is suddenly the only person in the world who can catch a killer, are teamed up to solve the case. The killer has a God complex and thinks he has been sent by god to commit these crimes. I've read that all before. I was ready to give up on What a concept, read the story and watch short videos online that enhance the story. I really wanted to like this book but found myself disgusted with the cliche's early on. An old, hard as nails, cop who is only months from retirement and a washed up drunk who is suddenly the only person in the world who can catch a killer, are teamed up to solve the case. The killer has a God complex and thinks he has been sent by god to commit these crimes. I've read that all before. I was ready to give up on this book early but I really hate having books in my abandoned list so I continued reading. The story is full of holes and there are things that are never explained, we never find out where the killer gets his money for example. The online videos were barley worth the effort to watch, the directing was extremely bad, the acting was fair with some known actors in small parts, the problem was the information. Some of the videos show you information before it appears in the book and some of them are from scenes that are not even in the book. I had hoped that the videos would give hints and clues that would add to the story but you could read the book without going online and not miss anything. Once I decided that I was not going to abandon this book, I discovered that everything in the book didn't have to be perfect for me to enjoy it. When I read stories about people visiting alien worlds, I have to suspend reality to a certain degree, I had to do the same with this book before I could enjoy it. Once I got past a few of the boring cliche's, I realized that despite myself, I was completely caught up in the story and couldn't wait to get to the next video. Level 26 was a weird experience for me. After reading the jacket cover, I thought this was a fantastic idea and I couldn't wait to start reading it. After reading the first four chapters I was ready to abandon Level 26 because it didn't seem to have anything new in the storyline worth the effort to read it. Now that I have finished Level 26, I think it was a pretty interesting experience and I will probably continue reading the trilogy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    Currently there are 25 levels to categorize serial killers. One is someone who just stumbles into killing. Twenty-Five would describe the sadistic psychopaths who find pleasure in suffering. Now imagine that one person has become even more evil than the serial killers you've heard about in the past? Imagine someone who has absolutely no compassion, no feeling, not even a soul. A person lacking all these characteristics is out there and because he doesn't seem to show any of the "normal" traits o Currently there are 25 levels to categorize serial killers. One is someone who just stumbles into killing. Twenty-Five would describe the sadistic psychopaths who find pleasure in suffering. Now imagine that one person has become even more evil than the serial killers you've heard about in the past? Imagine someone who has absolutely no compassion, no feeling, not even a soul. A person lacking all these characteristics is out there and because he doesn't seem to show any of the "normal" traits of a killer it impossible to catch him. This psycho has a name. It's Sqweegel. The one person who has the ability to catch this criminal is Steve Dark. In a state of mourning, thanks to the psycho, Dark is through with law enforcement and wants no part of the chase. But when the lives of his friends at the department are threatened, Dark decides to step in again. Will he be able to stop this madman before several other murders take place? Or will the world live in fear of Sqweegel until the day they die? To sum up this book in one word, is impossible. But for some reason, I'm the type of person that loves the impossible and do everything I can to try and make it possible. So as you've probably guessed, I've been doing some hardcore thinking (I know what your thinking, and yes it caused a massive headache, LOL) so as I pondered and looked through the dictionary (no I didn't really look in the dictionary but shhh, it's our secret) and the word that jumped out at me was: WOAH! Yes, all caps and an exclamation point. This is really difficult to review. Not only is there a book to read but at about every twenty pages, you can log onto www.level26.com and enter a password & watch a clip that will tie in with that section of the book. If you're a CSI fan, this book is probably shouting at you through your monitor, right now, saying "BUY ME, READ ME, LOVE ME". The author Anthony E. Zucker is the award-winning creator, producer, and writer of CSI, CSI: Miami, and CSI: NY. So, to be completely honest, this book scared the crap out of me!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gary Sedivy

    I regret that I have to say I finished this book. I don't particularly like slasher/torture books, for the same reason I don't go to slasher movies. I should have stopped at the book cover. Unfortunately once I start a book, I almost feel compelled to finish it. Sigh... Oh, well - warning there is a spoiler later on in this review. The bad guy is creepy, extremely so. The good guy, named Dark, is an emotional wreck, based on a previous encounter with the bad guy. How's that for a natural set up? I regret that I have to say I finished this book. I don't particularly like slasher/torture books, for the same reason I don't go to slasher movies. I should have stopped at the book cover. Unfortunately once I start a book, I almost feel compelled to finish it. Sigh... Oh, well - warning there is a spoiler later on in this review. The bad guy is creepy, extremely so. The good guy, named Dark, is an emotional wreck, based on a previous encounter with the bad guy. How's that for a natural set up? Of course, something the bad guy does 'forces' Dark to join in the chase. So, the only thing that makes Dark part of the human race is his new wife, who,just happens to be pregnant. Can you guess what the plot is? What I don't get, is how these sick twisted freaks, who spend all their time plotting and performing gruesome murders, can be so loaded with money, they can have several places, or homes, hire private jets to fly all over the world... There are a few inconsistencies in this novel... We are expected to believe there is an secret organization in our government whose job it is to assassinate American citizens (well, on the other hand with the Obama administration, maybe that isn't too far fetched). In one sequence in the story., the good guy seems to magically appear to thwart one of the torture scenes, but the bad guy escapes - it's not explained how Dark knew where to go, etc. And then when Dark's wife is kidnapped, and tortured and killed, there is almost no reaction, other than he killed the creep. And then he goes to the next case. Wow! From emotional cripple to fully functioning crime solver. I don't get it, his foster family killed by the serial killer - he collapses into booze and self-pity; but the love of his life is killed, brutally, and he becomes a mighty crime fighter. Won't read the next in the series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Didn't love this. It was not particularly well written: the characters were shallow and there was no effort made to give back story or an explanation for how the villain became the man he was. It was full of stock characters and charicatures. What there was was an effort to disgust and offend the sensibilities of any decent person by listing horrible crime after horrible crime then describing the horrors of the killer's secret chamber at the end. It was the written equivalent of a slasher film, Didn't love this. It was not particularly well written: the characters were shallow and there was no effort made to give back story or an explanation for how the villain became the man he was. It was full of stock characters and charicatures. What there was was an effort to disgust and offend the sensibilities of any decent person by listing horrible crime after horrible crime then describing the horrors of the killer's secret chamber at the end. It was the written equivalent of a slasher film, all shock and gore and no depth of story or character. Then, there is the online aspect of the book. Disbursed throughout the text, there are code words doled out that you can use to "unlock" some tidbit of video on their website. Firstly, you have to join the website to do it and provide personal information; the codewords are not enough. Secondly, the videos do nothing to enhance the story or the characters. They are either prurient or pointless. I didn't make it through half of them. The acting was not particularly skillful, nor the casting appropriate. In particular, the casting of a circus contortionist as the serial killing mad man didn't work at all. He was somewhat frightening (2 dimensional, but frightening) in the book, but just comic in the videos. I enjoy crime dramas usually. My previous opinions are not because I am easily shocked or overly moralistic. It is the forensic science combined with the intuition and reasoning of the investigators I find fascinating, yet somehow this novel, written by the CSI creator no less, managed to skip most of that all together. I'd call it a disappointing miss. Don't bother.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Level 26 was a breathtaking psychological thriller. Steve Dark is a former member of Special Circumstances, a section of the FBI that the public will never hear about. Special Circs investigates the worst of the worst in serial killers and often its agents are short-time members due to burnout, insanity or death. Steve Dark left because of all three. As the best agent, he was assigned the most difficult cases and his last case was to hunt down and eliminate a Level 26 killer named Sqweegel. Unfo Level 26 was a breathtaking psychological thriller. Steve Dark is a former member of Special Circumstances, a section of the FBI that the public will never hear about. Special Circs investigates the worst of the worst in serial killers and often its agents are short-time members due to burnout, insanity or death. Steve Dark left because of all three. As the best agent, he was assigned the most difficult cases and his last case was to hunt down and eliminate a Level 26 killer named Sqweegel. Unfortunately, the predator became the prey and after a close encounter between the two where Dark almost killed Sqweegel, the killer took revenge by gruesomely murdering Dark's entire foster family. This led to Dark's departure until he is forced to return by the highest members of government and Sqweegel himself. Their cat-and-mouse game of death and destruction pushes Dark to the furthest reaches of his mind and soul leaving a wake of destruction that can be compared to nothing seen before. This story was filled with dynamic characters, eerie settings and a lightning paced plot that kept me gasping for more. Coupled with the unique internet clips which are accessed using codes found throughout the book, Level 26 was an unstoppable thrill ride. Steve Dark is an ideal protagonist. He is damaged and moody and fills the shoes of a traumatized agent brilliantly. His intensity sets the tone for the book and his interactions with the secondary characters are riveting. Tom Riggins and Constance Brielle are stellar in their understated way of sympathizing with Steve and understanding his past and present transgressions. Steve Dark is a man on the edge of sanity and his counterpart Sqweegel is a perverse version of insanity. Sqweegel is the most evil of all killers ever to be found on the planet. His killing is indiscriminate and his methods are brutal and often disgusting. The trail of violence left in his wake is astounding and oftentimes I found myself stunned by the level of creepiness the author was capable of putting into words. Pitting these two men against each other is fantastic. Their cat-and-mouse chase is terrifying and the constant shifts in the plot left me off balance far into the book. A real question of who will win the battle is laid forth and the battle itself is astounding. Throw in a satisfying yet tantalizing ending and the promise of a second book in the series and Level 26 is easily one of the best books I have encoutered in a while. A solid 5 star rating if I have ever read one. I would highly recommend this book to fans of the thriller genre however I will throw a warning in there for those who dislike gore. This book is disturbing in its content at times and is not for the faint of heart!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Nesbit-comer

    There are so many errors in this book that it's almost unreadable. The timeline makes no sense. Some things are refernced as 20 years ago, but the current year makes it impossible, shoddy editing at best. Also, I don't think anyone can put together two shatter glass doors by himself in just a few hours. I thought that a digi book by the creator of one of my favorite shows would be amazing, but all i got from this was boring and predictable. The videos were cheesy and I stopped logging in early There are so many errors in this book that it's almost unreadable. The timeline makes no sense. Some things are refernced as 20 years ago, but the current year makes it impossible, shoddy editing at best. Also, I don't think anyone can put together two shatter glass doors by himself in just a few hours. I thought that a digi book by the creator of one of my favorite shows would be amazing, but all i got from this was boring and predictable. The videos were cheesy and I stopped logging in early on because I really just didn't care anymore.( plus i must add that I was extremely annoyed that I had to register to watch the videos. The website is hard to navigate and made the bad book more frustrating.)They did little to add to the scenes or progress the story and it actually took me out of the story to log in and wait to watch a video that was predictable and often cut out before it ever got interesting. No where does this killer make me thing that he should be classified as a level 26 and smearing butter on your body and shaving your anus was just unnessisary . . like most of the creepy scenes that just made me want to hurl this book out the window. The author goes way out of his way to make the story sound overly macho and listening to it on audio was even worse. Really I can't believe that this book made it to publication. Moreover I would not reccommend this book to anyone, and am upset that what could have been a neat idea was so poorly executed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Darcia Helle

    If you are looking for a fast-paced, graphic thriller, then you might love this book. If you are looking for character depth and believability, I would not recommend this one. I had several problems with this story. The main character, Steve Dark, is fairly young with a pregnant wife. They live in a million dollar home with no financial worries, yet neither of them appear to work. Sqweegel, the serial killer, also has total financial independence. We are never given explanations for how any of th If you are looking for a fast-paced, graphic thriller, then you might love this book. If you are looking for character depth and believability, I would not recommend this one. I had several problems with this story. The main character, Steve Dark, is fairly young with a pregnant wife. They live in a million dollar home with no financial worries, yet neither of them appear to work. Sqweegel, the serial killer, also has total financial independence. We are never given explanations for how any of them live so well without ever working. I felt Sqweegel's character was far too superhuman. He is omniscient, able to know everything and sneak everywhere without ever once slipping up even a tiny bit. He has access to all sorts of technology and, apparently, is able to easily infiltrate the lives of high ranking government officials. None of this is ever explained. There are other aspects I thought were too convenient for the story or too over-the-top. I won't name them all because that would give away too much of the story. This book offers little in the way of hope and pretty much no happiness. It is nonstop action, graphic violence, and emotional turmoil. The end leaves us hanging, nudging us on to book two in the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Unapologetic_Bookaholic

    Unbelievably dark and twisted. My kind of book. I certainly want to continue this series some day.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laren

    This book uses a new concept designed by the primary author, who is the creator of the TV show "CSI". The idea is that the book can stand alone as the first in a planned series of books, or the reader can choose to further immerse into the story via a website where you can see short films that purportedly bridge some small gaps between chapters in the story. Honestly, I wasn't that interested in the multimedia experience, but I was interested in what the creator of one of my favorite TV shows wou This book uses a new concept designed by the primary author, who is the creator of the TV show "CSI". The idea is that the book can stand alone as the first in a planned series of books, or the reader can choose to further immerse into the story via a website where you can see short films that purportedly bridge some small gaps between chapters in the story. Honestly, I wasn't that interested in the multimedia experience, but I was interested in what the creator of one of my favorite TV shows would write. The story is about the hunt for a serial killer so heinous that the FBI created a new level just to rank him properly (Currently there are 25 levels, with 25 considered to be the worst, but this one is given level 26, hence the title of the book). They call him "Sqweegel", and only one man, Steve Dark, has come close to catching him. But Dark left the job when his personal price became too high. Now the FBI wants to lure him back to the job so he can get rid of this killer for good. In my opinion, the book's biggest problem is that Sqweegel is not markedly worse than any other killer you may have happened across if you read a lot of crime books, true or fictional. It defies credulity in many parts, but it's not a non-fiction book either, so if you just go with it, you might be fine. However, I'm on the fence about if I would read the next in the series when in comes out. This is because I made the mistake of going to the website to get the full multimedia experience. First, it forced me to sign up for an account, which I am never a fan of when I intend to be a passive viewer and not a participant, even if it is free. But that aside, the videos ruined the whole thing for me. It was badly overacted from the very first video. Sqweegel was more clownish than scary due to the film's insistence on using the actor's bizarre movement skills even when completely unneccessary, and such skills weren't in the book at all. For some films, the book promises aren't delivered on. For example, it says the reader will see security footage, but the clearly edited filming from multiple angles negated any belief that it was just simple security camera footage. Finally, many of the films didn't add anything to the storyline at all. For example, do we really need to see a video of a text message on a phone? The multimedia part seems to be geared towards readers who lack imagination. If the full experience gets people to read when they don't normally read, then I don't suppose it's all bad, but I would recommend that others stick to the book and don't deviate like I did! Once you see the first video, you can't take it back, and it will likely color the rest of your reading experience if you haven't already finished the book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    I found this book disappointing on at least two fronts. Number one, it really seemed to glorify the killer as opposed to law enforcement. And this is nothing like "Dexter," where the killer is the main character. Sqweegel is just too perfectly awful, with his skin tight crime suit (in white, no less, like a bride) and his time spent lurking in small uncomfortable spaces so as to be creepily in the "right" place at the "right" time. So he requires 4.5 pounds of butter to properly grease himself t I found this book disappointing on at least two fronts. Number one, it really seemed to glorify the killer as opposed to law enforcement. And this is nothing like "Dexter," where the killer is the main character. Sqweegel is just too perfectly awful, with his skin tight crime suit (in white, no less, like a bride) and his time spent lurking in small uncomfortable spaces so as to be creepily in the "right" place at the "right" time. So he requires 4.5 pounds of butter to properly grease himself to get into the suit (which he seems to spend the majority of his time in)--who buys this butter and how the heck does he pay for it? (And does he escew eating, so as never to have to have a bowel movement? We see him obsessively fixing the suit, but not scrubbing it clean). He has multiple hidey-holes all over the place--who pays the mortgage/rent/taxes? He obviously has no time for gainful employment--he's much too busy studying every aspect of the life of the next victim. He has all these credit card accounts set up, but who covers the charges? My second observation: this would have been much better as a TV show (not surprising, as the author was involved in CSI). I have the distinct impression that this book was cobbled together after it was rejected as a television script--he might as well make something out of the effort, mightn't he? I didn't use the digital aspects, as I truly feel that a book should be able to stand on its own two feet, without needing the crutch of a website to help it along. So much of the plot seemed to be derivative from TV shows like "Criminal Minds"--Steve Dark seems to be based on Hotch from that show. Not dreadfully original and I'm not sure I'll spend more time on the remaining books in the trilogy, despite some dangling threads that I'd like to see resolved. Thank the Goddess that I got if from the library instead of paying for it. Two rather grumpy stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    4-stars Level-26 is a pretty radical book written by the man who created the television show CSI. There are even movie clips on the internet you're supposed to watch at specific times throughout the story. You don't have to watch them, though; I watched less than half of them due to internet connection issues, and I don't feel like I missed anything, but they're actually pretty cool. If you've seen very much crime television programming on cable at all, you've probably come across a guy named Doc 4-stars Level-26 is a pretty radical book written by the man who created the television show CSI. There are even movie clips on the internet you're supposed to watch at specific times throughout the story. You don't have to watch them, though; I watched less than half of them due to internet connection issues, and I don't feel like I missed anything, but they're actually pretty cool. If you've seen very much crime television programming on cable at all, you've probably come across a guy named Doctor Michael Stone. He's a forensic psychiatrist from Columbia University famous for developing a scale of evil which goes from, 1, "Those who have killed in self-defense, and who do not show traces of psychopathy" all the way up to level 22, "Psychopathic torture-murderers, where torture is the primary motive." This is like that, only the scale goes up to 25, and the story itself is about trying to capture the world's first and only known level-26 killer. This isn't the type of book that going to win literary awards. As a matter of fact, I can't help but think of this type of book as "junk read" or a "trash read." But every now again I quite enjoy one of those. If you do too, you might want to check this out. I thought it had a very James Patterson-like feel to it. Good Patterson, though; Patterson at his best.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    I enjoyed this book. There were some things I was able to guess and figure out ahead of time, but it was certainly tense enough that I plowed through it in less than 24 hours! I've read some reviews that were frustrated with the characters, but I went into this expecting entertainment, and that's exactly what I got. If you are looking for the great American novel, this isn't it. But if you want a fun book FBI thriller, you'll enjoy Dark Origins. The cyber-bridges were a fun and interesting addit I enjoyed this book. There were some things I was able to guess and figure out ahead of time, but it was certainly tense enough that I plowed through it in less than 24 hours! I've read some reviews that were frustrated with the characters, but I went into this expecting entertainment, and that's exactly what I got. If you are looking for the great American novel, this isn't it. But if you want a fun book FBI thriller, you'll enjoy Dark Origins. The cyber-bridges were a fun and interesting addition to reading! The only warning that I'd give is that if you aren't fond of the original CSI show, you probably won't enjoy the bridges.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I like the concept of this book, but the execution left me cold. There is a web site connected to this book, where you can go and watch video; however you first need to sign up with your email and relevant information. Hated that idea, but did it anything to see what the hoopla was about. The first video was really suggestive and horrible in content. The rest were less so. The writing was okay, but nothing special. It seems Mr. Zuiker and his co-author are interested in being really gory and expl I like the concept of this book, but the execution left me cold. There is a web site connected to this book, where you can go and watch video; however you first need to sign up with your email and relevant information. Hated that idea, but did it anything to see what the hoopla was about. The first video was really suggestive and horrible in content. The rest were less so. The writing was okay, but nothing special. It seems Mr. Zuiker and his co-author are interested in being really gory and explicit. Not my cup of tea.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mia Boloz

    When I first started this book I thought it was a little weird but the back of the book described such an exciting idea and plot that I kept on reading and I am so glad that I did. This book was very good. Even though Sqweegel was a bit creepy, it added a whole new dimension to the storyline that kept intrigued. I thought the ending was sad but good and it leaves off with many questions that make me excited to read the next book in the series!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chethana Ramesh

    One a day will die Two a day will lie Three a day will cry Four a day will sigh Five a day ask why Six a day will fry Seven a day Oh, my. For those of you in the dark (pun intended), Anthony Zuiker is the creator and executive producer of the famous television franchise, CSI : Crime Scene Investigation. This alone would be enough for all Crime fiction fans to make a beeline to read his book. The added incentive of a website, Level26.com, where readers can log on to watch video clips of the story, as they One a day will die Two a day will lie Three a day will cry Four a day will sigh Five a day ask why Six a day will fry Seven a day Oh, my. For those of you in the dark (pun intended), Anthony Zuiker is the creator and executive producer of the famous television franchise, CSI : Crime Scene Investigation. This alone would be enough for all Crime fiction fans to make a beeline to read his book. The added incentive of a website, Level26.com, where readers can log on to watch video clips of the story, as they go along reading the book, is a new, and perhaps welcome concept to allow readers to experience the story better. Anthony Zuiker says in his interview that he took to writing because he wanted to take this medium and find a way to make to create new reading experiences with readers. Has that been achieved? Well, for me, yes and no. Yes, because this book created a new experience of creepiness, despite the fact that I’ve grown up on hair-raising choices of horror fiction for years. No, because at the end of the day, it is a rehash of the same crap that seemingly goes on every odd psycho’s mind. It seems rather convenient to make the key antagonist go exceedingly haywire with his killing sprees and blame it on ‘Psychosis’. Too easy for the author to explain away such inane human behavior, one would say. *** The Key Characters: So we have the protagonist, Steve Dark, who is true to his name and lives in a very dark place in his disturbed mind. And we have an antagonist, Squeegel, who is the quintessential psychopath, except that he has been recognized as the highest ever grade in the taxonomy for psychos, a grade 26 against the existing highest grade 22, known to the world. Sibby, is Dark’s wife, the romantic love interest in the story, and consequent victim, who suffers the worst of the situation. The reader’s heart goes out to her, and especially her baby, especially during their suffering at the hands of the said fiend. Riggins, the aging investigator, is annoying as the puppet that is helpless against the forces that play his strings. Constance as Dark’s colleague seems more of an add-on to make the story a little more interesting, although she has a fair contribution to make during the course of the investigation. Wycoff is just too cliché. A powerful man misusing his authority is a done-to-death premise in most TV/ film offerings. But this guy is particularly more trying than most. *** The Pros: The only appealing (& perhaps, the saving grace) of this book is the deep love between Dark and Sibby. The scenes describing the fragile and yet, unshakable equation between them are endearing. Horror lovers would enjoy being constantly scared for the characters. Each turn of the page alleviates and does ample justice to the reader’s fear. The grim fates that befall the hapless victims of a psychopath killer out on the loose, send multiple shocks up the spine. The website is a good add-on for readers who like to live the experience of the horror on screen. It did help put a perspective to the appearance of the characters just as the author envisioned them to be, especially Squeegel. The white-suited apparition reminds the reader of the infamous Voldermort and a particularly flexible Michael Jackson, although his yoga-type movements are a bit over the top and almost comical, given the seriousness of the horrific situation. Dark’s exceptional hunting skill of being able to shut out his personal grief to ‘empathize’ with the killer’s mindset, albeit in a horrible way, to be able to predict his moves and track him down inspire awe in the reader. *** The Cons: Squeegel is referred to as the monster throughout the book. Call it nitpicking if you will, but calling a monster a ‘monster’ is just unoriginal to the point of being amateurish. Perhaps the reader’s expectations of Anthony Zuiker’s offering were too high to begin with, but one would expect no less from the creator of CSI. The tag line on the paperback is ‘Serial Killers aren’t made. They’re born.’ Well, agreed, that is supposed to indicate that there are certain classes of killers who do not need reason to kill. Why then, does the antagonist have fixed ideologies in his mind that progressively pivot towards certain kinds of injustice meted out by a certain groups of people? Does not make sense. However it was the host of unanswered questions, or discrepancies that leave the reader with a sense of being left ‘hanging’ at the end of the novel. The first question is why? Why would a man want to go about killing indiscriminately? Agreed, you are allowed into his twisted mind enough to understand that he has a deep-rooted hatred for what he perceives as wrong, which in itself is rather vague, because the reason for his warped mentality, is not uncovered throughout the book. He has a hatred for widows. Because, they cash their martyr husbands’ cheques, soon after their death and ‘cheat’ with other men? Twisted logic indeed. So, he needs to kill innocent animals that were connected to war widows. I mean, seriously? The reader is left to assume, perhaps incorrectly, that this character was subject to injustice by his mother/aunt/guardian sometime in his childhood…well, you never find out. He has a loathing towards teenaged boys, because they drink and waste time when the parents expect them to be in college…huh? Seriously? So much so, that the scene where Squeegel rapes them into bloody mess of beseeching humans is disgusting in its brutality. But then again, why? Was he tortured by a man during his own teenage? No answers come forth in the book. Another example of his twisted irrationality is the assumption that church priests need to be punished because they are child molesters. Damn, but then, generalizing a section of the populace is perhaps an evil that is highly consistent with realities of society we live in. More than one story has used psychos who kill a particular sect of people, because one among the group has harmed them in some way. And yet again, the scene where he explodes cute little finches is horrendous, only worse than the episode where he slaughters beautiful horses breaks the heart. Animal lovers are sure to be disgusted with this madman, as perhaps is the author’s intention. However, the recurrent exasperation for the reader, is as mentioned before:Why? Every little episode builds up the questions in the reader’s mind, and when the hapless reader is sure that the answers shall be revealed at the end, they never get answered. Another major question that pops into the reader’s head is: What does this Squeegel character do for a living? How is he able to afford multiple credit cards, multiple safe houses and hideouts all over the country, latest state-of-the-art equipment to stalk his victims, jets to fly around…etc. when all he seems to do all day (and night) is stay cooped up in his horrid basement to plan the gruesome death of his next victim. It does not make any sense to leave such huge gaps in the story. So, after closing the book, the reader is left wondering why and how Squeegel did what he did. Perhaps the biggest discrepancy is that the timelines do not match up along the story. The editors of the novel seem to have skipped checking the fact that the protagonist is supposed to have stayed with Sibby a year before. But then, he also took a full year to try and heal himself from the repercussions of Squeegel’s revenge. The origins of Squeegel also have inconsistencies; it is confusing and unclear because he is supposed to have gone uncaught for first twenty, and then around thirty years. What is that supposed to mean? ‘This made no sense to Dark - Riggins being here, the goons tailing him, the ticking clock. Sure if you screwed up in Special Circs, your career ended in one of the three ways: demotion, dismissal or death. But death usually came by the hands of the monsters you pursued. Not the people in charge.’ Well, all one can say after reading this is, it makes no sense to the reader either. Other than the supposition that Wycoff misuses his authority beyond rhyme or reason, it seems too far-fetched that he would get every Tom, Dick and Harry eliminated to hide a dirty little secret that is almost commonplace in today’s age of Clinton and more recently, Trump. Another major qualm is when Steve Dark supposedly lost his mind when his family was brutally murdered, he seems extremely well-recovered at the end, when he loses the one person he cherished the most…and the reader wonders, really? *** The conclusion: It is one thing to have an open ended termination to the tale where imaginative readers have a thrilling opportunity to assume what they fancy. It is quite another to pose a bunch of questions throughout the book for the reader to mull about, and end up never answering them. Not a good premise at all. After all, readers are an intelligent species who like to be challenged, but certainly not kind enough to allow their intelligence to be taken for granted. Today’s readers are spoilt for choice, with a perpetual stream of good books to read. One expects a lot better from a celebrated & seasoned crime fiction creator of Zuiker’s caliber, to have given us better, with his novel. In conclusion, this is just too dark to be worthy of a purchase. Pick it up only if you are desperate to find something or anything to read, or if you truly enjoy a supposed horror tale, with senseless violence & puke-worthy gore. *** Excerpts: Will it end here? Are you the one who will bring death unto me? They (Special Circs) work cases most citizens never heard about, would never want to hear about, and certainly did not want to think possible. If they did, they’d never leave the house. Not that they’d be safe at home.A high percentage of the really twisted stuff happened behind front doors all over the country. Like the husband who thought his wife had been running around with an old college boyfriend, then took a golf club and impaled her with it, from cavity to throat. This was stuff nobody in their right minds wanted to think about for more than a few seconds. This was stuff he thought about all the time. He lived for the dark side of man. But this case at hand and this snuff film they’d just watched… Well, he could almost understand the silence. ‘Squeegel is a Level 26 killer –the highest rank we now recognize , and about four ranks above what the rest of the world recognizes. After hearing it, Dark found it difficult to unhear it. The words seem to dig through the pulpy mass of his brain, creating their own little echo chambers. You could silence the source, but you couldn’t stop the relentless echo. He thought of Dark struggling with his own barriers, especially the ones Squeegel had erected especially for his hunter. This made no sense to Dark - Riggins being here, the goons tailing him, the ticking clock. Sure if you screwed up in Special Circs, your career ended in one of the three ways: demotion, dismissal or death. But death usually came by the hands of the monsters you pursued. Not the people in charge. The only way to catch him is to become like him. To think the sick little things that he does. To climb inside of his diseased mind and try to make sense of it all. But I can’t do that, not now…that’s what you do. I try to catch this monster, I’m absolutely fucking terrified that I ‘m not going to come back the same man. No deductive logic. No reasoned guesses. No gut. No hunch. I am the monster. What am I thinking? A holy peace came over him, as the blade took off his right arm at the shoulder joint. Then his leg, his mid-thigh. He’d been trying to tell him one last thing. He’d been trying to thank him. ***** For more book reviews, short stories and poetry, follow my blog : chethanaramesh.blogspot.com

  22. 5 out of 5

    John

    Very creepy novel! But a good read for anyone into crime novels.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katisha

    Steve Dark is a retired criminologist. The case that broke him and sent him running away with his sanity in tatters is back to haunt him. Sqweegel wants to play some more, and only his old adversary knows the rules well enough to be a worthy adversary. Can Steve Dark do this again though? Can his new life--his life with Sibby Dark and their as-yet unborn baby--take the strain of him climbing back inside an horrific serial killer's warped brain? You'll have to read the book to find out. I wasn't s Steve Dark is a retired criminologist. The case that broke him and sent him running away with his sanity in tatters is back to haunt him. Sqweegel wants to play some more, and only his old adversary knows the rules well enough to be a worthy adversary. Can Steve Dark do this again though? Can his new life--his life with Sibby Dark and their as-yet unborn baby--take the strain of him climbing back inside an horrific serial killer's warped brain? You'll have to read the book to find out. I wasn't sure about this 'diginovel' when I first started reading it. Could I trust that the website with the 'bridges' would be there when I logged on? Would the videos add to the book, or detract? In the end, the experience of reading my (and the world's?) first 'diginovel' was an enjoyable one. Admittedly, being a fast reader, I kept my computer up whilst reading, so that I didn't have to keep logging on. I just entered the codes for the bridges as I came to them, every half hour or so, and it was still a bit irksome til I got used to the idea. The videos were pretty good, so that eased the pain. Did the videos enhance the book? Well the performance given by Daniel Browning Smith definitely made Sqweegel a very disturbing bad guy for me. Not sure about the rest of the casting though. The version of Steve Dark that I had in my head was a lot more dishy, and more complex, than his celluloid portrayal. That's the joy of books, the characters and the settings are exactly as you imagine them to be. Anthony E. Zuiker has presented us with a 'novelty' novel by interspersing his text with online video pieces. The videos reminded me of (the even darker) 'Girl Number Nine' short, featuring Gareth David-Lloyd. The book, which could be read without bothering to watch the videos--though I recommend that you do view them--is a quite good, dark crime novel. The hero is pleasantly flawed, the psycho is suitably barking yet clever, the heroine is brave. I will definitely be looking to read the next in the series and can recommend that others try out the 'diginovel' experience for themselves. I do hope, though, that if the idea catches on the use other authors may put the format to has equally good acting and production values as well as using the 'bridges' appropriately. Best bit of the book? What Riggins learns but doesn't tell Dark.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Lessard

    Serial killers are categorized by levels 1-25. In Anthony E. Zuiker's thriller series debut, "Level 26: Dark Origins," there is one so vicious, the FBI has given him his own category. No one knows the identity of the murderer known as Sqweegel, or how many people he has killed. He comes up with innovative ways to administer death, and has an endless supply of resources to spy on anyone who tries to capture him. FBI agent Steve Dark comes close to apprehending Sqweegel, who retaliates by killing Da Serial killers are categorized by levels 1-25. In Anthony E. Zuiker's thriller series debut, "Level 26: Dark Origins," there is one so vicious, the FBI has given him his own category. No one knows the identity of the murderer known as Sqweegel, or how many people he has killed. He comes up with innovative ways to administer death, and has an endless supply of resources to spy on anyone who tries to capture him. FBI agent Steve Dark comes close to apprehending Sqweegel, who retaliates by killing Dark's entire family. Dark abandons his search for Sqweegel and leaves law enforcement. But after a particularly grisly murder, a former colleague is dispatched by the secretary of defense to persuade Dark to resume his duties. Zuiker, creator of the TV drama "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," provides a worthy debut, the first in a trilogy featuring Dark. His portrayal of Sqweegel is both comprehensive and impressive. Sqweegel seems preternatural, with his latex suit, contortionist maneuvers and ability to remain undetected. It turns out that Sqweegel has been watching Dark, who has started a new life, and his pregnant wife, Sibby. He provides a rhyme meant to taunt Dark and provide vague clues about his intentions. But the events that correlate to the crimes are a bit convoluted. Zuiker offers an interactive supplement called "cyberbridges," where the reader can log onto a Web site to view brief footage of 20 scenes meant to bridge chapters of the book. The story stands on its own without these clips, and viewing them may interfere with the reader's interpretation of "Level 26."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steve Mount

    Zuicker and his co-writer introduce a very compelling concept, linking the book with video clips on a web site, accessible in sequence as you read. A few of the "cyber links" were a little lame - a text message and an email - but most of them were good video clips filling in gaps between the chapters. A few of the videos, BTW, are NSFW. The book was a little rushed. The villain, Sqweegel, was a bit too superhuman, able to fly from one coast to the other in record time. The book explained this, bu Zuicker and his co-writer introduce a very compelling concept, linking the book with video clips on a web site, accessible in sequence as you read. A few of the "cyber links" were a little lame - a text message and an email - but most of them were good video clips filling in gaps between the chapters. A few of the videos, BTW, are NSFW. The book was a little rushed. The villain, Sqweegel, was a bit too superhuman, able to fly from one coast to the other in record time. The book explained this, but I wasn't convinced. The villain also had cameras hidden in some of the most top-secret places in the country, including on board Air Force Two. Not sure how he managed that, and his ability to get access to these places was never really pursued. The team introduced in Level 26 could be fun to follow - the novel sets up at least one sequel, with a couple of secrets being kept from main characters by each other that we really want to know. The second book will, apparently, follow the team as they attempt to track down a Sqweegel-like villain killing people in Italy. Not sure how that will play out - it won't sustain a series, anyway.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sean Harding

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Like a train crash that you can't look away from this book is just appalling. Really badly written with terrible dialogue, a mind numbingly stupid plot and cardboard cut out characters you just don't care about. I ignored the 'gimmick' of the videos you can link to - this is a book not a movie. Apparently this guy created CSI, I'm no fan of CSI, silly show it is, but this makes CSI look like iterature. One of my favourite scenes is the bad guy, a seemingly invincible character picks up a new born ba Like a train crash that you can't look away from this book is just appalling. Really badly written with terrible dialogue, a mind numbingly stupid plot and cardboard cut out characters you just don't care about. I ignored the 'gimmick' of the videos you can link to - this is a book not a movie. Apparently this guy created CSI, I'm no fan of CSI, silly show it is, but this makes CSI look like iterature. One of my favourite scenes is the bad guy, a seemingly invincible character picks up a new born baby, and I mean like minutes old, and the baby looks at him curiously. Do they know anything about babies? The whole premise of a secret Government agency called Dark Arts is just beyond hilarious And if the good guy did what this one does to the bad guy in any form of reality he would be himself locked away. What a lot of twaddle!! If you want to have a laugh at a really rubbish book - read this one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    This could have been a cool concept, a novel with an online component. This one just didn't nail it. It seemed like the online segments served to make it easier for the author to avoud describing some difficult scenes and, since everything that happened online is later described in the book anyway, needing a computer to further the plot became cumbersome enough that I gave it up fairly early on. I didn't really dig the plot itself, but it's possible this genre (about a super evil serial killer) This could have been a cool concept, a novel with an online component. This one just didn't nail it. It seemed like the online segments served to make it easier for the author to avoud describing some difficult scenes and, since everything that happened online is later described in the book anyway, needing a computer to further the plot became cumbersome enough that I gave it up fairly early on. I didn't really dig the plot itself, but it's possible this genre (about a super evil serial killer) just isn't my cup of tea. That said, I found the acknowledgments hilarious. The author, who had just written a graphic book of horror and sadism thanked his wife who he refers as his "muse". Wow, that's some marriage!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melisa

    Great book! Follow two agents Riggins and Dark trying to catch a serial killer they call Squeegal who is characterized as level 26, the highest rank a serial killer or criminal can get! Find out how Dark and Sqeegal are linked together and the lengths Dark will go through to stop this monster before its too late! The best part about this book is its an digi-novel, which gives you a glimpse into the story! Every 20 pages or so you have the option of going on the website and watching a short film Great book! Follow two agents Riggins and Dark trying to catch a serial killer they call Squeegal who is characterized as level 26, the highest rank a serial killer or criminal can get! Find out how Dark and Sqeegal are linked together and the lengths Dark will go through to stop this monster before its too late! The best part about this book is its an digi-novel, which gives you a glimpse into the story! Every 20 pages or so you have the option of going on the website and watching a short film (a part from the book) starring some A-list actors. You can even have the killer call you himself, but thats optional!!!! If you like crime novels then read this one. You'll enjoy it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Despite the odd spelling error and some time line stuff that didn't quite add up, I found this to be an intense thriller and I've read loads of serial killer stuff which is often predictable, but not the case here. Original concept with the website tie-in, though I didn't bother with this, it stands up as a good crime-thriller without this element. Did wish there was some more explanation of the killers origins though, a few too many questions left unanswered!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Teri Cooper

    A right riveting crime thriller with a rather nasty killer at the centre of the story. Enjoyed losing myself in murder and mayhem and thought the accompanying YouTube clips of various scenes was a pretty cool concept. As other readers have commented there were a few cliches along the way, but hey, that's crime! 4 stars.

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